What Happens in Vegas can Change Your World

They say that what happens in Vegas stays in Vegas, but that’s not always true. Sometimes what happens in Vegas changes your whole world.

I don’t come to Las Vegas often. Today I’m here because an 18 hour stopover saved me 400$ on a plane ticket. Two years ago I came on a travel hacking adventure to see how many different hotels I could stay at in a long weekend, and 18 years ago I made a trip to Vegas that changed my life. 

Walking down the street today, I was thinking about that first trip I took to Vegas, and what I could share if I wrote a story about it. The first lesson that popped into my head was the familiar quote–“Leap and the net will appear.” 

“That’s so cliché, and you’re supposed to be writing your 7 Lessons from 7 Continents story this week, not a nearly two-decade-old story about Vegas,” the critic and control freak inside my head said. 

And just as I had this thought, a person dressed in a Spiderman costume leaped out in front of me from behind a building. Although Spiderman is more about webs than nets, I took that as a confirmation from the universe that this week you are supposed to be hearing the lesson of how Las Vegas taught me to leap into the unknown world of my dreams.

My first trip to Vegas was in 1997. I was a budding account executive at a high tech PR agency and visiting Sin City to manage media interviews at my very first big tradeshow. Even though I secretly hated many parts of my first real job and had been actively exploring other opportunities, I’d prepared for the show for months and was excited to go. And then unexpectedly, five days before I left for Vegas, I got offered my first international job in Thailand. And they needed me to be there to start in exactly four weeks.

I was in a conundrum. I knew if I quit my job, I’d miss out on the career opportunity of managing the project in Vegas. If I said no to the opportunity to go to Asia, I knew I’d always regret it.  So, I decided to contrive a plan to do both.

Here’s what happened and the lessons of leaping that I learned from the process: 

1. Accept the Offer

Staying at the agency was easy to envision and it was a safe career path. Going to Thailand was a whole sea of mystery, but I was enticed by the adventure and the possibility. I had no idea what to do, so I said YES.

I’m not advocating for leaping blindly into everything that comes you way, but sometimes you have to start with the yes even when you don’t understand every detail that comes with an offer. Some people like to wait until they have all of their ducks in a row before taking action, but if you’re waiting on the ducks to sort themselves out, it is never going to happen. I’m certainly not an ornithologist, but I’ve never once seen a flock of ducks waddling around in a line. Listen to your gut and say, “hell, yes!” when the offer you’ve been day-dreaming about in your cubicle knocks on your door. Only dead ducks hang out in rows. 

2. Put Things in Motion

Remember our lesson on the laws of physics and the laws of possibility? You need an action to get the process going.

I accepted the job in Thailand, and I got on the plane to Vegas. I was in motion. I needed to finish my project well, and find a way to be in Asia in four weeks.

I spent the next four days in the Las Vegas Convention Center managing media interviews and sneaking away to use the payphone in the hallway every time I had a break. I studied airline listings in the yellow pages, dialed the toll-free numbers for international reservations agents, and put tickets on hold until I had figured out the best and cheapest ways to get to Bangkok. 

In the unassuming lobby of the convention center, surrounded by swarms of corporate conference attendees labeled with large-font name badges, I successfully arranged my escape plan. I couldn’t wipe the grin off my face. My colleagues thought I really loved Vegas.

3. Pull the Trigger

Once you’re in motion, it’s much easier to gain the speed you need to do the more difficult tasks.

I returned from Las Vegas with a successful media trip under my belt and a one-way ticket to Southeast Asia in my pocket with a departure date just 16 days away. Since I had to give two weeks notice at my job, I had no choice but to walk straight into my boss’ office and let him know that I was leaving.

My immediate supervisor was amazing and told me to follow my dreams. The boss who ran the agency, however, told me in a few words that he wasn’t surprised at all, and I didn’t have what it takes to be successful in the field of PR and communications. I was too young and polite to tell him to F*&@ off, but I knew at this moment that I was making the right play, and that saying yes to this opportunity would be one of the most important decisions I’d ever make for my long-term career success. 

4. Dance

After you pull the trigger, you’ve got to jump all in. It’s like dancing, once you’ve taken a step away from the security of watching from the sidelines, you’ve got to give it all you’ve got—even if you’re worried about looking a fool. You have more to gain than you have to loose.

The 16 days between quitting my job and packing up my life to move to Thailand were a blur, but one moment remains crystal clear. As I waved goodbye to my friends in the airport and turned to walk down the jetway, I remember in slow motion taking the step over the threshold between the airport and onto the plane. 

“What if this is the biggest mistake of my life,” the scared part of me hesitated in that split second.

“The worst case scenario is that you absolutely hate it, and then you buy a ticket and fly home,” the brave and more rational part of me responded.

That step onto the plane was an important one, and the next years included a lot more steps forward, sideways and backwards—all part of the dance.

I’ve done more than my share of tripping and stepping on peoples’ toes in the last 18 years, but not a single part of me regrets jumping into the unknown and the path that my leap landed me upon. Life is less risky if you stand still, but you’ll never live your dreams if you aren’t willing to fumble around on the dance floor.

Your story probably won’t contain a payphone, convention center hallway, or even a big fat book of yellow pages, but I’m sure it will contain conundrums, controversy and courage. I wish you well as you take your leap, and promise from the other side that you most certainly won’t regret it.

Viva Las Vegas.

 

 

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